Downtown hub in transition after Shakespeare’s Pizza demolished

Page 1A and Page 4A of the Columbia Missourian highlight the destruction of the downtown Shakespeare's Pizza location.

Page 1A and Page 4A of the Columbia Missourian highlight the destruction of the downtown Shakespeare’s Pizza location.

Shakespeare’s Pizza was more than a restaurant. It was a drinking buddy to some. A college hangout for others. An escape from the bland and mass produced workflows that so many other restaurants adopt.

It was quirky. The architecture, the people, and the little touches, like the towel-like napkins, imbued it with personality.

Emotions ran high when a clawed, yellow excavator tore into the brick walls on June 17, 2015.

At the Columbia Missourian, we told this story through still images, a gallery, ample print product space, an aggregation of reactions on social media, and, perhaps the most ambitious undertaking, a time-lapse of the nine-hour demolition.

We weren’t alone. The Columbia Daily Tribune posted one, as did the business itself. Each was around 2 minutes in length, and, though the vantage points differed, each was shot from the southeast.

In our weekly staff critique, we looked at how different media outlets covered the demolition and compared it to our coverage. We typically have only one photographer on shift at a time, but we brainstormed what we would do differently next time if resources weren’t a concern.

Here’s what the staff came up with:

  • Incorporate multiple vantage points into the time-lapse. A general rule of thumb, videos shouldn’t show the same scene for more than five seconds, staffer Cody Lohse said. Multiple angles would provide visual variety, scope, and additional context to the piece.
  • Use slow motion to highlight the peak action, such as the crumbling of the final wall. The first eight or so hours of the construction dragged on in a calculated, predictable, and mostly uneventful manner. The felling of the final wall seemed to happen in a flash and with an unexpected twist as bricks cascaded onto adjacent Ninth Street. Highlighting and extending this scene would enable the audience to analyze and savor the historic building’s final moments.
  • Integrate historical images into the video to show how the space and its surrounding environment has changed over time. Most everyone is familiar with the current downtown Columbia skyline, but the city’s significant transient population might be surprised with the skyline of 5, 15, or 25 years ago.

In all things, we challenge our staffers to show something unique that viewers can’t see for themselves. Whether we achieve this through access, equipment, or dedication, we owe it to ourselves and our audience to deliver the highest quality with the resources we have.

The four essential elements any great brand needs

John S. Ankeney designed the University of Missouri seal and its board of curators adopted it on March 31, 1903. The seal includes the university's motto, "Salus Populi," along with a crescent, grizzly bear, and the U.S. arms.

The University of Missouri board of curators adopted the institution’s seal, designed by John S. Ankeney, in 1903.

Marketing types and other nerdy, font-loving folks (myself included!) often get too hung up on the transient and granular aspects of branding. How does the logo look? What configurations are acceptable? Has the color palette been established? And let’s not even wade into the weeds of typography.

Yet, a brand is distinct from these considerations. Logos, color palettes, and fonts are all used in branding (that is, the communication of a brand), but they don’t define the brand itself.

My soon-to-be alma mater, Mizzou, and its Truman mascot is an example. The university’s tiger symbol has been reimagined at least 15 times throughout the decades, according to the MU Archives. When most people think of Mizzou, they might not even think of a logo. Perhaps the historic Memorial Union or stately Jesse Hall come to mind instead.

Jesse Hall anchors the downtown Columbia skyline on March 16, 2015.

Jesse Hall anchors the downtown Columbia skyline on March 16, 2015.

1. Iconic visuals. For Mizzou, its six iconic columns and its administration building with its distinctive dome are not only landmarks but are also symbols of the university and all that it embodies. People gravitate toward symbols and such icons, usually distilled to simple shapes, are more salient and memorable than often text-heavy logos.

Using multiple icons broadens the reach and potential interest to the brand’s various target groups. For example, the iconic rock “M” at Faurot Field likely appeals to a different crowd than those who fancy Memorial Union and its gothic architecture.

Though buildings might be the most common manifestation of iconography, it doesn’t have to be a structure or architectural feature. Maybe it’s a signature outfit or apparel item that defines your brand or it might be trademark equipment or machinery that’s revolutionized your industry or market.

The Mizzou Alumni Association dedicated Traditions Plaza in honor of MU's 175th anniversary in 2014.

The Mizzou Alumni Association dedicated Traditions Plaza in honor of MU’s 175th anniversary in 2014.

2. An established, yet flexible group culture. No matter if the brand is an educational institution or a clothing line, the people that buy into it are likely incredibly diverse.

Traditions or rituals can unite these people with staggeringly different demographics. The bevy of Mizzou rituals, such as Tiger walk and prowl, homecoming, and the M-I-Z, Z-O-U chant, lend a common experience and sense of unity to the participants. Some traditions are open to all while others, such as Mizzou’s secret societies, are available to only a select few.

Having some traditions open to all lets potentially everyone interact with the brand while reserving some traditions for a select group taps into exclusivity marketing and can make a brand more valuable.

Though the culture should be defined, leave room for both formal and informal adaptation. Participants might (and should) organically evolve aspects of the brand alongside decision-makers, who will also want to strategically introduce or phase out elements of the defined group culture, as appropriate.

The residence on the quad, built in 1867, houses MU's chancellor and is the oldest-standing building on campus.

The residence on the quad, built in 1867, houses MU’s chancellor and is the oldest-standing building on campus.

3. A rich, narrative history. Missouri, founded in 1839, is the first public university west of the Mississippi river, a fact you’ll likely know before even stepping foot on campus. This tidbit is plastered all over admissions materials and is endlessly repeated by admissions reps and administrators alike.

Mizzou has more than 175 years of history to cherish, but if your brand was recently founded, consider apparel line Hollister as inspiration. John Hollister Sr. founded the company in 1922 as “the fantasy of southern California,” according to the company.

In reality, Abercrombie & Fitch created the child brand in July 2000 and developed an imaginary history to accompany its supposed 78-year-old brand. People buy into history. They like to feel a part of something bigger than themselves and a history allows them to do this.

MU highlights its core values between the columns on the Francis Quadrangle during the university's 175th anniversary celebration.

MU highlights its core values between the columns on the Francis Quadrangle during the university’s 175th anniversary celebration.

4. A defined set of values. Mizzou’s values are respect, responsibility, discovery, and excellence.

Don’t be afraid to define your brand more concretely, though. Cultivate your brand’s values by determining what attributes you want to emphasize or de-emphasize. Think how you’d how you’d like your brand perceived or how its members should act. Cool and classy? Elegant and exclusive? Your pick.

Through branding, you can change how you communicate these values and in what formats, but don’t change the values themselves once they’ve been established.

A tale of two pages

The front page of the June 6, 2015, edition of the Columbia Daily Tribune, left, and the June 7-8 edition of the Columbia Missourian.

The front page of the June 6, 2015, edition of the Columbia Daily Tribune, left, and the June 7-8, 2015, edition of the Columbia Missourian both highlighted a 5-year-old boy’s struggle with cancer.

On June 3, 2015, one of our staff photographers pitched an idea to our Director of Photography, Brian Kratzer, about attending a vigil for Bryson Smith, a 5-year-old boy stricken with cancer.

Three days later, a reporter was assigned and we received a photo request to cover the event. In my tenure at the Missourian, we’ve covered dozens of vigils and published numerous photos of candle-holding and often teary-eyed attendees. I wondered how we could make this one different.

To answer that question, we needed more information. I went over to the reporter and picked his brain. There were two vigils planned, we found out. The first was at a local elementary school where the boy’s grandmother worked. The second at the hospital where the child was undergoing treatment. (The family had been planning to attend the vigil, but when Smith’s hospitalization days before prevented them from visiting, the vigil was brought to them.)

I suggested staff photojournalist Adam Vogler focus on the second vigil and he scoped out the area prior to attending. In conjunction with the reporter, we found out which room the Smiths would be in. We then focused on gear. Our 400mm lens was checked out, so he took a 300mm with a 1.4 teleconverter. Between the two, we’d have a 420mm lens at the cost of some additional light hitting the sensor.

The photo Vogler brought back mesmerized me. I went over and talked to the night news editor, Gerri Berendzen, about display options. Columbia’s annual Art in the Park festival was slated as our print centerpiece, but after showing Berendzen the photo, she agreed we could swap the stories.

Text was the next challenge. The event was Friday and our next print edition was our Sunday-Monday edition, so I texted the reporter and then talked with the assistant city editor about trying to avoid an event coverage approach and use the vigil as a springboard to the mother and son’s story rather than as a focal point. That would make the story less time-sensitive and give it more staying power to justify running it two days after the fact.

Next was design. It took some negotiation to get a full, six-column presentation, but after several drafts, the package occupied a good two-thirds of the page. It made an impression.

“Outstanding photo. Outstanding design. Outstanding headline,” our Executive Editor for Innovation, Tom Warhover, wrote the staff the morning the story hit newsstands. “Amazing print front page this morning.”

Hate feature hunting? Read these 5 tips

A man biking south on Ripley Street stops to pet a cat on June 1, 2015. Metadata: f/11; 1/800; ISO 8000; 140mm focal length

A man biking south on Ripley Street stops to pet a cat on June 1, 2015, in Columbia, Mo.
Metadata: f/11; 1/800; ISO 8000; 140mm focal length

Some photographers think of feature hunting as an opportunity to run home and do their laundry. Others use it as a chance to grab a bite to eat.

Whenever the assignment pool runs dry, a good editor will boot their photogs to the curb and expect them to come back with something other than a full stomach.

If you approach feature hunts grudgingly, here are five ways to make the process a little less painful and a lot more productive:

1. Give yourself structure. The world is a big place and it can be overwhelming to try and make something of nothing without some sort of guidance. This can be as simple as a adopting a theme or visual motif. Love dogs? How about a portrait series of four-legged friends and their owners? Feeling blue? Challenge yourself to incorporate the color into your photography for the afternoon.

2. Find the gaps. Expand your comfort zone and inform your worldview at the same time. Look at past coverage to discover what topics or geographic areas your outlet has covered most. By doing so, you’ll know where the gaps exist. Cover them aggressively.

3. Nurture your curiosity. Strike up conversations with strangers. Get the pulse of the community and what makes it tick. Once you find something visually interesting to document, approach it with a fresh mind and pair of eyes. Don’t assume you know how something works. Even if you think you know, let your subject explain it in their own words for a richer and more expressive narrative.

4. Be attentive. So many of life’s greatest moments are fleeting and incredibly subtle. Give yourself the best chance at capturing them by pocketing your phone, earphones, and making people think you’re a crazy person who’s being stalked because you keep looking over your shoulder. (Sometimes great action unfolds behind you, like the shot of the fella petting the cat above.) Also, keep your camera on, focused to infinity, and at a “safe” aperture/shutter speed combination so you can react quickly when the moment arrives.

5. Focus on the humanity. It’s easy to come away from a feature hunt with great pictorials and lovely landscapes. Without people, though, these are little more than stock images. If you love shooting patterns, sunsets, or landscapes, incorporate this passion with a human element to give your visuals depth, meaning, and broader relevance.

Does Instagram make people lazy?

A man skateboards south along a sidewalk at the University of Missouri's Francis Quadrangle on May 25, 2015.

A man skateboards south along a sidewalk at the University of Missouri’s Francis Quadrangle on May 25, 2015. Metadata: f/9; 1/15; ISO 20000; 50mm focal length

I haven’t touched my blog in two months and three days. The absence hasn’t been for a lack of images. Since my last post on May 22, 2015, I’ve published 42 images. They’ve all been on Instagram, though.

The simplicity is addicting. The format is refreshing. I need only carve a sentence or two for each image and my newest square is live.

With a few taps of my thumbs, the image above could have been published in seconds. Instead, I labored over a blog post for hours.

I expressed my frustration to a friend as we talked on the phone earlier this evening.

“I’ve been saying that technology makes people lazy for years,” she smugly replied. I, too, wanted to blame technology, but ultimately couldn’t.

We use technology for its efficiency. Whether we are lazy, though, depends on how we spend the time saved through that efficiency.

So go ahead and enjoy the simplicity of Instagram or your favorite social media app, but don’t do it at the expense of posting only a sentence or two when more is warranted.

Learning how to ‘Crop until it hurts’

I sat in the northeast corner of rural Nebraska in 2012 eating a shrimp salad and listening to Charles Snare, Chadron State College’s Vice President of Academic Affairs, talk about leadership.

“You know, it takes 10 years to become an expert on a topic?” he said during the conversation. I think he was right.

I’ve been editing visuals for two years and still find myself being challenged and stretched. Recently, I’ve been paying special attention to cropping. Sitting in weekly critiques with editing greats Brian Kratzer and Jackie Bell has forced me to reevaluate how and why I crop.

“Crop until it hurts and then crop some more,” my friend Tim Tai likes to say.

Today I edited four photos for an article about the Columbia’s bus system. The lead photo I chose was pretty loose. Here’s the original:

Columbia resident Steven Ward smokes a cigarette before boarding a Columbia Public transit bus and heading west on March 19, 2015. Photo by Jenny Justus/Missourian

Columbia resident Steven Ward smokes a cigarette before boarding a Columbia Public transit bus and heading west on March 19, 2015. Photo by Jenny Justus/Missourian Metadata: f/6.3; 1/160; ISO 400; 14mm focal length

My attention goes to the bus first. Steven, who’s front and center in the caption, is a pretty measly portion of the frame. With the “safe crop,” we trim a lot a bit off the sides to reduce the apparent distance but haven’t really improved the photo much.

The "safe crop" slices off about 50 pixels from the sides but doesn't materially improve the photo.

The “safe crop” slices off about 50 pixels from the sides but doesn’t materially improve the photo.

Pretend that the edges of the bus are limbs. Photographers are often very careful when composing so that subjects’ limbs aren’t loped off awkwardly. Editors, too, many of them former photographers, appreciate the photographer’s attention to detail and will leave the “limbs” fully in. The problem is that most of the action happens around the core of the subject’s body. The feet, while sometimes important, often allow a lot of empty space to run wild in a photo.

Back to the bus. If the edges of the bus are limbs, what happens when we chop off the bus’s head and feet? Thanks to Gestalt and the law of continuity, we expect that the bus will have a roof and wheels. Do they need to be in the frame, then?

Let’s try the “crop until it hurts” version.

Steven is now a more prominent part of the composition, is in an intersecting third of the frame, and the color similarities between the bus and his jacket are highlighted.

Steven is now a more prominent part of the composition, is in an intersecting third of the frame, and the color similarities between the bus and his jacket are highlighted.

This version gets rid of the tilt, brings us closer to Steven, and plays up the repetition of color we see in his jacket and on the front of the bus.

We take a somewhat static photo of a bus and inject some vitality with the human element.

Such a tight crop makes me focus on the man and the "Wabash" lettering more. The bus is still there to add context, but it isn't overpowering and no longer dominates the frame.

Such a tight crop makes me focus on the man and the “Wabash” lettering more. The bus is still there to add context, but it isn’t overpowering and no longer dominates the frame.

Learning in the Sooner State

Two children peer over the second-floor overlook at the University of Oklahoma's Sam Noble Museum of Natural History on March 7, 2015. The building's construction was finished in 1999.

Two children peer over the second-floor overlook at the University of Oklahoma’s Sam Noble Museum of Natural History on March 7, 2015. The building’s construction was finished in 1999. Metadata: f/8; 1/320; ISO 1,250; 50mm focal length

I love learning. It’s what led me to the Missouri School of Journalism in 2013 and why I began applying for doctoral programs last year.

When I was a child, I fancied the three letters that followed a name for the exclusivity they imparted. Now that I’m older, I understand a Ph.D. as being more about the opportunity to continue learning, self-development, and the chance to interact with and learn from a diverse group of individuals.

As politicians and university presidents are fond of reminding the public, education correlates with opportunity.

A father watches his son interact with the “Columbian Mammoth Tableau,” a life-size sculpture of a family and mammoth at the University of Oklahoma’s Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. “Twelve thousand years ago, giant mammals—remnants of the great Pleistocene megafauna—roamed across Oklahoma,” according to a nearby plaque. “Columbian mammoths would have been found on this very site.”

A father watches his son interact with the “Columbian Mammoth Tableau,” a life-size sculpture of a family and mammoth at the University of Oklahoma’s Sam Noble Museum of Natural History. “Twelve thousand years ago, giant mammals—remnants of the great Pleistocene megafauna—roamed across Oklahoma,” according to a nearby plaque. “Columbian mammoths would have been found on this very site.”

I spent the past two days meeting and interacting with the faculty and students at the University of Oklahoma’s Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, and man, am I impressed with its branding.

It’s the little things — like the soap dispensers with the school’s logo, the welcome and directory banners, the innovative printing station, and the half-dozen iWood information kiosks (costing $4,175 a pop) — that leave such a positive impression. The architecture, furniture and trapping all come together to make the place unique and memorable.

It doesn’t feel at all institutional. A third-level terrace offer stunning views of the campus. The walls are personalized with the accomplishments of past students and the faces of future professionals.

A boyscout peers over the second-floor overlook at the University of Oklahoma's Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

A boyscout peers over the second-floor overlook at the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art.

The college is the fourth-largest on OU’s campus and houses about 35 faculty. I casually met many of these and enjoyed longer meetings with Ralph Beliveau, Peter Gade, and Glenn Leshner.

In a Q&A session earlier today, members of the graduate admissions committee shared their insight on how to make one’s application stand out:

  • Identify a problem or research area you’re interested in. This shows interest and demonstrates maturity, the committee members said.
  • Make contact with someone at the school and reference this connection in the applciation. “This shows us that you didn’t just print out 70 copies of an application, throw them up in the air, and see where they land,” one committee member said.
  • The sun sets on the stone bridge at the University of Oklahoma's Brandt Park. The space, which sits on the east side of campus, is named in honor of OU's sixth president, Joseph August Brandt.

    The sun sets on the stone bridge at the University of Oklahoma’s Brandt Park. The space, which sits on the east side of campus, is named in honor of OU’s sixth president, Joseph August Brandt. Metadata: f/2.2; 1/500; ISO 32; 30mm focal length

    Larry Laneer, assistant to the graduate director, accurately described OU’s campus as sprawling. At more than 3,000 acres, it’s nearly three times the size of the University of Missouri’s main campus.

    And now, as a reward for reading to the end, I reward you with this fun fact: my dad was born in Oklahoma and his dad spent a year at OU in its engineering program.

    Let the cold get to you

    A man walks down Ninth Street amid blowing snow on Sunday. Columbia could see from six to 10 inches of accumulation by Monday, according to the National Weather Service. Metadata: f/4.5; 1/250; ISO 25,600; 124mm focal length

    A man walks down Ninth Street amid blowing snow on Sunday. Columbia could see from six to 10 inches of accumulation by Monday, according to the National Weather Service. Metadata: f/4.5; 1/250; ISO 25,600; 124mm focal length

    The snow started falling Sunday night. I’d been keeping a watchful eye trained on the heavens all day, hoping to venture out and photograph in its frosty beauty. Alas, nature didn’t reward me until 7:30 p.m., after the sun had already set.

    Despite this setback, I still went out, after donning a ridiculous number of jackets and making sure my only exposed flesh was a small patch for my eyes.

    Blowing snow swirls around a lantern attached to the front of Memorial Union on Sunday. Snow began falling in Columbia around 7:30 p.m.

    Blowing snow swirls around a lantern attached to the front of Memorial Union on Sunday.
    Snow began falling in Columbia around 7:30 p.m. Metadata: f/8; 1/500; ISO 25,600; 300mm focal length

    I invested two hours in the biting cold. The snow only picked up its intensity and fell harder the longer I stayed out, yet, I lasted long than my iPhone. It died after about an hour in my pocket, even though it was still half charged.

    Visibility was the hardest part. Every time I raised the camera to my eye, my breath would fog up the viewfinder. I felt like an impressionist painter, composing from vague shapes and muted colors. I tucked my camera inside my jacket every chance I could get, knowing if I left it out, the cold would halt its autofocus system. With a 300mm lens attached, it wasn’t an easy feat.

    A group of three visits on the Missouri United Methodist Church’s second floor on Sunday. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for eastern Missouri that is in effect 'til 6 p.m. Monday.

    A group of three visits on the Missouri United Methodist Church’s second floor on Sunday. The National Weather Service issued a winter storm warning for eastern Missouri that is in effect ’til 6 p.m. Monday. Metadata: f/4.5; 1/60; ISO 25,600; 150mm focal length

    When the cold finally broke me, I carefully stood outside my apartment building, peeled off my outermost jacket and snugly wrapped up my camera body and lens. (Internal condensation can form within the lens and/or body when exposed to drastic temperature changes, so creating a “vacuum” of air with the jacket allows my gear to undergo the transition more smoothly.)

    I fed Instagram first and then created a gallery on the Columbia Missourian’s site. After chatting with Missourian Director of Photography Brian Kratzer, I drifted off to sleep for a few hours.

    When my eyes fluttered open, it was just past 6 a.m. and I had a text from our DoP, informing our staff that the University of Missouri had canceled classes and asking that we photograph what we could from where we were and transmit as we were able.

    I foolishly thought I’d venture out for just an hour, until the sunrise, to capitalize on the great morning light. Sunrise never came. It got brighter, but the clouds were too dense to allow the sun to fully pierce them.

    The driver of a jeep brakes on snowy roads for a stop sign on Ninth Street early Monday. About 6 inches of snow fell between 8 p.m. Sunday and 4 a.m. Monday, according to the Columbia Public Works Department.

    The driver of a jeep brakes on snowy roads for a stop sign on Ninth Street early Monday. About 6 inches of snow fell between 8 p.m. Sunday and 4 a.m. Monday, according to the Columbia Public Works Department. Metadata: f/7.1; 1/640; ISO 12,800; 182mm focal length

    One hour turned into eight and produced a few more galleries, dozens of Instagram posts, and even some pizza while listening to Pictures of the Year International judges Kim Komenich and Janet Reeves share their insights with us.

    Then David spoke. David Rees chairs the photojournalism faculty at MU and is beloved by all equally for his wisdom as well as his wit. A student asked how to convince others of his ambition; how to make others think he wasn’t just another kid hoping to run off and cover a bloody conflict.

    David’s reply? Photograph the snow.

    An MU Campus Facilities employee uses a snowblower on the parking lot behind Pickard Hall on Monday morning. At 6 a.m., MU canceled classes and closed the university for the day.

    An MU Campus Facilities employee uses a snowblower on the parking lot behind Pickard Hall on Monday morning. At 6 a.m., MU canceled classes and closed the university for the day. Metadata: f/9; 1/500; ISO 12,800; 146mm focal length

    In his delightfully concise reply, Rees imparted his wisdom in a gracious and profound way. Some yearn for accolades, recognition, and the right to cover “topics that matter,” usually grand photo epics involving international travel and exotic locales.

    Gear alone doesn’t make great stories. Connections don’t. Experience doesn’t. These are all variables that can allow a story to be told more efficiently, but without photographing the snow — without covering one’s own community and learning how to connect with people that you might not ever see again — you can’t build character and instill trust, two variables that matter infinitely more than the most expensive gadget or the industry’s most vaunted connection.

    Stay cold, friends.

    Returning to Colorado

    A man jogs past Douglas Kornfeld's 2008 "Gordian Knot" sculpture at the Colorado School of Mines campus on Dec. 22, 2014. The accompanying plaque reads, "In 333 BC Alexander the Great attempted to untie the Gordian Knot. Finding no end to the knot, or a way to unbind it, Alexander sliced it in half with his sword. "Cutting through the Gordian Knot" is often used as a metaphor for a complex or intractable problem solved by a single or bold stroke."

    A man jogs past Douglas Kornfeld’s 2008 “Gordian Knot” sculpture at the Colorado School of Mines campus on Dec. 22, 2014. The accompanying plaque reads, “In 333 BC Alexander the Great attempted to untie the Gordian Knot. Finding no end to the knot, or a way to unbind it, Alexander sliced it in half with his sword. “Cutting through the Gordian Knot” is often used as a metaphor for a complex or intractable problem solved by a single or bold stroke.” Metadata: f/7.1; 1/250; ISO 4000; 70mm focal length

    It looks like we’re in for another snowy Colorado Christmas.

    I flew from Kansas City to Denver on Sunday. It was just raining then. Monday, the snow hit while we were having lunch with my sister for her birthday. Today and tomorrow are supposed to be clear skies in the 30s, but on Thursday, Christmas day, we’re supposed to have temps in the 40s and more snow that evening.

    During yesterday afternoon’s flurries, I walked over to the Colorado School of Mines’s campus. The construction projects I had last seen almost a year ago had largely finished and new ones had taken their place.

    A man jogs through the Colorado School of Mines campus on Dec. 22, 2014.

    A man jogs through the Colorado School of Mines campus on Dec. 22, 2014.

    The campus was largely deserted and quite peaceful. I love the public art, modern architecture, and seclusion that university campuses provide. They’re their own little cities.

    Despair to dominance

    Missouri linebacker Eric Beisel watches from the bench during the second quarter of the Tigers football game against the Razorbacks at Memorial Stadium on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014. Metadata: f/5.6; 1/1600; ISO 1250; 400mm focal length

    Missouri linebacker Eric Beisel watches from the bench during the second quarter of the Tigers football game against the Razorbacks at Memorial Stadium on Friday, Nov. 28, 2014. Metadata: f/5.6; 1/1600; ISO 1250; 400mm focal length

    Missouri didn’t pull ahead until the fourth quarter of today’s game. It was looking pretty dreary, so during the second quarter, I tried to capitalize on that mood and kept my eyes out for the players on the bench that reflected this feeling.

    The cool and warm tones of the blackish-blue uniforms and the fiery red beard drew me in. It was one of those situations where I had him in my camera’s sights and just waited for his head to turn and look wistfully at the scoreboard.

    The sun sets on the MU Spirit Squad as it forms a pyramid during the third quarter of the Tigers football game against the Razorbacks at Memorial Stadium on Nov. 28, 2014. Metadata: f/16; 1/1000; ISO 1250; 18mm focal length

    The sun sets on the MU Spirit Squad as it forms a pyramid during the third quarter of the Tigers football game against the Razorbacks at Memorial Stadium on Nov. 28, 2014. Metadata: f/16; 1/1000; ISO 1250; 18mm focal length

    My colleague Tim Tai locked down hard on sports action, so I focused on features. When I wasn’t editing, I shot the first two quarters with a 400mm and then switched to a wide-angle lens for the final two.

    Fans rushed the field after Missouri beat Arkansas 21-14 at Memorial Stadium on Nov. 28, 2014. Metadata: f/4.5; 1/85; ISO 1250; 16mm focal length

    Fans rushed the field after Missouri beat Arkansas 21-14 at Memorial Stadium on Nov. 28, 2014.
    Metadata: f/4.5; 1/85; ISO 1250; 16mm focal length

    In a very long and drawn out fourth, Missouri made a comeback and beat Arkansas 21-14.